Bodega San Alejandro Calatayud | Spanish Wine Lover
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WINERIES

Founded as a cooperative in 1962 in Miedes de Aragón (Zaragoza), its name honours Saint Alexander, whose remains are buried in the village's Franciscan convent. The logo is inspired in the relics kept in Miedes' oldest brotherhood.

Like most Garnacha producers in Aragón, their wines are geared towards the export markets. The US is their main destination -Las Rocas de San Alejandro is made for E&J Gallo whereas Evodia goes to importer Eric Solomon. Nevertheless, both brands are available in Spain and in other countries.

The winery produces around three million bottles per year. Its flagship brand, Baltasar Gracián, named after a Spanish Golden Age writer born in Calatayud, offers almost unbeatable value with most wines sold under €10.

The Viñas de Meides range is made from up to 35-year-old vines planted in chalk-clay soils and is sold in large retail stores, supermarkets, bars and restaurants.

The winery makes good use of their vineyards' high altitude (800 to 1,100 metres), which means slow ripening cycles, and the diversity of soils, ranging from chalk-clay and gravel to slate.

There are several winery and vineyard tours which include a visit to the Theatre of Nature and Senses exhibition. Winelovers can also become “winemakers for one day” and make their own blends, as well as join “Baltasar's kitchen” to prepare seasonal menus and take part in various workshops. At “Baltasar space” there is a restaurant, conference room, wine bar and “Baltasar's corner” to learn more about the Aragon-born writer.

TASTING NOTES

Baltasar Gracián El Político Garnacha 2013 Tinto
Las Rocas de San Alejandro 2012 Tinto
Clos de Baltasar Gracián Garnacha Nativa Edición Limitada 2011 Tinto
See all the wines

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